SL075: Collaborate To Accelerate

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Collaborate To Accelerate

Collaborate To Accelerate

James Taylor interviews Mia Liljeberg and they talked about how to Collaborate To Accelerate

In today’s episode Mia Liljeberg talks about how to Collaborate To Accelerate.

Mia Liljeberg is a trusted adviser and speaker but could be best described as a change catalyst. Based in Sweden, she travels the world helping leaders and their organizations to upgrade to the next level through small calibrations. To date, Mia has visited over 100 countries, worked in 20 countries, and lived in 10 of those on 5 continents. As a TEDx speaker and Certified professional facilitator, she gives her customers unique experiences. Her 20 years of managing change in different industries and countries have given her the tools and insights to ignite, accelerate, and guide her customers with great results.

 

What we cover:

  • Moving from a competition to a collaboration mindset
  • Going from consumer to contributor
  • Results from surveying 8,000 speakers

Resources:

 

Artificial Intelligence Generated Transcript

Below is a machine-generated transcript and therefore the transcript may contain errors.

James Taylor
Hi, it’s James Taylor, founder of SpeakersU. Today’s episode was first aired as part of International Speakers Summit the world’s largest online event for professional speakers. And if you’d like to access the full video version, as well as in depth sessions with over 150 top speakers, then I’ve got a very special offer for you. Just go to InternationalSpeakersSummit.com, where you’ll be able to register for a free pass for the summit. Yep, that’s right 150 of the world’s top speakers sharing their insights, strategies and tactics on how to launch grow and build a successful speaking business. So just go to InternationalSpeakersSummit.com but not before you listen to today’s episode.

Hey there, it’s James Taylor and I’m delighted today to be joined by Mia Liljeberg. Mia is a trusted advisor and speaker but could be best described as a Change Catalyst. Based in Sweden. She travels the world helping leaders and their organizations to upgrade to the next level through small calibrations. Today, Mia has visited over 100 countries works In 20 countries and lived in 10 of those on five continents. As a TEDx speaker and Certified Professional facilitator, she gives her customers unique experiences. Her 20 years of managing change in different industries and countries have given her the tools and insights to ignite, accelerate, and guide her customers with great results. And it’s my great pleasure to have Mia join us today. So welcome, Mia. Thank you. So share with everyone what’s going on in your world just now.

Mia Liljeberg
Currently, I’m on around the world trip for 18 weeks. I’m currently in Lima, Peru, after been to Europe, Asia and Oceania. Wow. So now we have four weeks left before we are heading back to Sweden.

James Taylor
So you I think you you traveled to New Zealand as well for the global speaker summits you’d been there. So you’re making a big trip as part as part of the speaking or is it a mixture of speaking vacationing or how’s it working for you?

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah, that makes I go for the mix. So it’s both mix. So speaking facilitation, writing on the next book, And a lot of vacation as well. So how did you get started as a

James Taylor
speaker? Where did it all begin for you?

Mia Liljeberg
I started off as a consultant management consultant helping a lot of large companies with change. And then I wrote a book five years ago about communicating with the images, how it really can cross makes it so much easier to cross cultural boundaries and language boundaries. So that’s how I got into speaking. So before I was just a consultant, doing facilitation workshop, advising, and then I got into the whole speaking business.

James Taylor
And when you started making that transition from the consulting world, who were those early mentors, and who do you find it Who are some of your mentors today that could have helped you?

Mia Liljeberg
Five years ago, I didn’t have any mentors. So it was very tough. And then 2014 we started the National Speakers Association in Sweden, and that’s when it was then that’s when the whole world opened up for me with the mentors both in Sweden and all around the world.

James Taylor
And whether any particular names there was was there any any speakers that kind of took you under their wing? Or was it more than the fact that there were speakers that you you’d seen on stage? And you can you thought, actually, that’s kind of where I want to, I want to get to I want to get there with my my speaker business. I want to get there in terms of that level of craft and speaking.

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah. So it’s like, five years ago, when I started, it was like, I saw this huge gap between me and everyone else. And then when we start the association, and we start connected, like, you saw that they were all like you. So I mean, for the Karen, who is the initiator of the Swedish speaker Association. I mean, he and his twin brother to her and those are the ones who, who came up with the idea about what do you think about collaborating instead of competing is like, haven’t thought about that? So that was a big mind shift, August 2014.

James Taylor
And then you’re originally an engineer before you got into Nigeria. You’re an engineer by trade, I understand. So with without any skills, you able to have tried to move across from the world of, of engineering into the world of speaking.

Mia Liljeberg
Yes, as I’ve been working as in five different continents with a lot of both logistics and management projects. I mean, the whole planning the management and the thing about working internationally about dealing with different cultures and communicating across barriers, that has been really, really helpful. And also like, I love to travel. So it’s like, I love to, to see new cultures meet new people and, and I think that’s part of my strange brain. I, I wasn’t on the TV show for the smallest in Sweden. And my husband’s done with that one. And that’s, that’s part of my engineering brain is like, I see so many connections, I see the patterns and I see when there is a pattern and I can connect patterns where people can’t see patterns, but I also see With a patent is missing. And that is so valuable within change management to really see you don’t have to do lot of big changes. You just have to find the small things to calibrate. And that’s when you get exponential growth.

James Taylor
So I’m interested, you’re traveling, you’re in Peru and in Lima today as well. Because we have so many attendees on this. Previous we’ve had 6000 attendees on this summit and for all 120 countries. Are there any other any countries on your hit list? Any countries Maybe someone’s watching this just now they’re a speaker, and there’s maybe country or country you haven’t yet spoken and you haven’t traveled to? The maybe if you were to mention just now you might have someone here saying Actually, I’m basically I could I can help bring you over.

Mia Liljeberg
And that is so fun, because as I’ve been to over 100 countries, and I’ve worked in so many countries like Canada. I still haven’t been to Canada. It’s like, how come I haven’t into Canada.

James Taylor
And one of the things that I noticed that you’ve done which I thought was really Interesting you’d like a survey together, you’d serve it over 8000 speakers, specifically about collaboration? What What did you learn from that? Well, first of all, what what was it the thinking behind creating that, that that survey in the first place? What was your your purpose in doing that? And what were some of the key results that you found from that,

Mia Liljeberg
as I mentioned about how we started the Swedish Association to do the mind shift going from speakers or competing to speakers could collaborate, to share the pie. And that is, as I mentioned, I was speaking at the global speaker summit in Auckland, New Zealand in February, and I was the Swedish representative there. That was my topic was really about collaboration because that is what I’ve seen from being a member and also being one of the founding board members of an association is really that people join an association and they want the referrals. So okay. I’m a member with With my referrals, but it doesn’t work that way, you know that? Will not. So it’s like, but there’s like, there should be a method, there should be a pattern. What is it? And that’s when that’s when I thought, well, the best way I think I have grasped a pattern, a method. But why don’t I just ask everyone else. So that’s when I went out with a survey to all the speaker associations in the world that are connected to the global speaker Federation to make sure that we got the views from everyone. And they really confirmed all that I thought from the beginning. So there are 8000 preferred speakers around the world that are members of associations. And out of those, not everyone. That’s how it is. But the ones who answered us gave really good input, for example, that just by being a member and being able to collaborate, they’ve gained a lot of value, like some made over 50,000 you US dollar just from collaboration. And that is that is quite interesting considering that we think that speaking business is quite alone some business that you are not collaborating, you’re competing. But if you’re really collaborating, you’re really helping each other. And so OSI seed is, it’s a, I see this mount, as I see in pictures, I see it as a mountain, the mountain of value of collaboration. So it’s like, at the bottom, everyone, like being everyone who’s listening to this, to this summit is the consumer. Anyone who becomes a member of an association is the consumer. They are there to get information. And that’s the easy pass away. But that’s not how you really get the real value out of it. You get a lot of value. From this summit, you get tons of value. But in order to get even more value, and get the things that people say and people say, Oh, we I want the reverse. I want the referrals, how I get the referrals. Well then the next step is connecting, you have to take this first step out first active step. And that is about Connecting, Connecting with other speakers being open and interested in other speakers being being generally interested in other people. And that is a good step. But there’s a lot of people who have connected with me and that I have connected with, but I wouldn’t refer them. That is not good enough. Because the next thing is, we have so many connections, but what we really want is the contributors, the people who are really contributing, because when you’re contributing, you get visibility, and you get credibility. And that’s how you become top of mind. For other speakers to really refer you because there’s so many speakers out there. It’s a tough market.

James Taylor
Yeah, it reminds me a little bit I remember when having company Chemistry and we’re actually twice Swedish, just like Spotify, for example, there was a funny stage before Spotify, where we had Napster and a lot of peer to peer things going on. Yeah. And if any, if anyone ever used any of those things to be able to illegally to get music, so imagine and one of the things you always had you had the, you had the kind of the exact terminology you had the people that would put things up when they were the ones that were very active to contribute. And then you had this other group and they were actually called the leeches if I think you remember that was a term that with leeches, so they never contributed anything. It was always about taking something from it as well. And I thought it was an interesting, interesting, I mean, you you told me this, this idea of going from really going from being a consumer of it to actually getting from collaboration. And it feels that this is one of those industries where, for historical reasons or whatever reasons. There’s a lot of lone wolves in this in this in this business and maybe because of how it’s you know, it’s started maybe that that’s,

Mia Liljeberg
I definitely

James Taylor
see a trend changing especially the younger speakers coming up who I’m thinking people wonder like Frederick I’ve collaborated with Frederick on things, Gil Peter sale, you know from Russia as well as now in Singapore. And all that content is all about collaboration, how can we help, you know grow the pie? How can we collaborate on each with each other as well? What example Have you seen recently of a really interesting ways that speakers have collaborated with each other to create something new and novel that’s very interesting and adds value in the market?

Mia Liljeberg
I mean, I would say like, what are you putting on now with international speaker summit? That is fabulous way to collaborate, and also what the Gil and Frederick Heron was doing when they did, she had keynote. So I mean, to be able to invite other speakers you have to lose in your fare. Your state presence. And I think that that’s the core of it, like the speakers who are confident in themselves are the ones that are willing to let go of that fear and to trust other people. So I mean, I’ve seen so many different ways of I mean, it’s I mean, you have collaboration where people are collaborating and going to towards a common target market. That is really good way to see that okay, we can complement each other, we can make a bigger offer. And then you have the ones where people are standing in for each other when they are, if they’re sick, or if they are and a transportation issues you have where we are really contributing to each other to really make each other better on stage. That is also one I mean, that there’s so many different dimensions. So it’s like when people get into To this speaking business, they, they believe that okay, I want I want to get my, I want to get it for referrals I want to get on stage, I want to get the high fees, but it’s like, that is just the quantitative measurements that you are looking for. Yeah, behind that one. That’s the top of the iceberg. underneath. It’s all of these different connections that you can see that well, when I spoke and connected to that person over there. That one, I was invited. I did a guest blog post on that one. Someone saw that one and they they thought I should be on stage there when I was on stage there that I mean, it’s a snowball. Yeah, I mean, when I’m, when I’m trying to track back how I got, how I got the referrals. It always started with a smooth, smooth, smooth connection and contribution. And someone saw it.

James Taylor
I think one of the ways I think about collaboration is I’m a obviously this summit is you said is a perfect is an example of collaboration. This is kind of what we’re doing. I’m collaborating with Lots of other speakers have been creating something that wouldn’t have existed without all of us coming together. You know, it’s I could not I could not create a summit with just me because it would be boring. So, you know, I have to bring all these great minds together and, and it doesn’t. I feel that we’re all able to learn from each show. And I think the other ways I’ve seen that in the speaking world worked very well. And sometimes it’s talked about and sometimes it’s, I think it’s quite under the surface is mastermind, you know, I, I know a number I’m involved in to masterminds, and with others with other kind of speakers and groups, and one of those masterminds. We all speak some actually two of us speak on the same, pretty much the same topic. And the other ones to speak on a different topic. But the thing that all links us together, is we sat down, there’s eight of us and we sat down and said we could essentially be eight years worth of keynotes for a conference, let’s say a marketing conference because we all that’s one of the things we all share in common. As we will come from different marketing backgrounds in one way or the other, so we just kind of sat down together. And we’re like really diverse from different parts of the world. But we but we, we share we come together and different things. And also, it’s not just referring work, okay, that’s, you know, I do it this year, then sometimes I’ll refer someone in the group. But I find the really interesting thing is then when you say, what can we create the hasn’t even existed before together. So I know, I know, the seven strengths that I have in his weaknesses I have, and in one of my other members of my mastermind, she’s an amazing workshop person. She is like, the best workshops I’ve ever seen. And that’s not probably one of my key strengths. So we’ve we’ve started working on things like how can we collaborate, you know, because she’s so good at that site, I’m, I’m a little bit better, especially some of the online things as well. And that’s, I find that really creative because you can and you don’t have to be saying well, I can only have that type of thing. Relationship with That person you can, you can do it internationally. And I’ve seen this happen, especially for the music industry again, we used to call them swaps. So you would you would bring a foreign artists in to your country. And you would do a tour together essentially you would do maybe six shows or 10 shows together. I’ve just a good friend of mine, his great guitar Swedish guitarist, kudos for Kenyans who work with Oscar Peterson. And so I would, you know, my peers, I bring him to work with a British artist, and he would go on tour and together around the UK and a really nice tour, and then offered organize a tour in Sweden, and then that as we go over there, and you can have so many of those different relationships, and it always is quite a good way to enter into a market because that speak in that place has real strength in that market has the connections already, but you have your strengths and where you are. So you can kind of do those those swaps as well.

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah, because what it comes down to is that there is already trust in that market from that person. Yes, it’s like you get so so what’s next I’m starting to realize that in order to collaborate efficiently, there needs to be a lot of trust. I mean, the trust, and that’s why I’m talking about that there’s a lot of consumers, that’s where how everybody’s starting consuming because there’s so much to consume. But then you have to start to do the connections, and one study the connections, you can start to contribute. And when you start to contribute to each other, that is like a saying that I can help you polish on those skills. And you can help me polish on these these skills. We’re not competing, we’re just making each other better, stronger in all markets, or we could go together to a market so he’s like, just contributing can be contribution can be done in so many different ways, especially just this fine tuning, calibrating the scales, so we become better on stage or in our whole business management. Because some people don’t need referrals. I mean, some people just need to be able To say no to the low paid gigs, sharpen the skills to raise the fee to get less gigs. So it’s all about making those movements. And

James Taylor
I guess one of the slight dangers of collaborations is they can, at times it can feel quite tactical. So you can have lots of different things kind of going on. And they’re not necessarily particularly joined up or there’s not an overarching strategy. You’re not doing them in a, in a quiet, thoughtful way. And so is there any suggestions, any kind of guys to how, how to make that create a plan around that collaboration? And I think maybe more from a strategic level rather than just individual tactical relationships.

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah. And, of course, I mean, because I mean, we are humans and we are connecting to each other. So it’s like we are connecting hands we are doing it but as you say, we do it without a plan. But if we have a plan for our speaking business, that is how we can start to collaborate with a purpose. Which means that when I go back to this value mountain, it’s like consuming we are consuming but let’s face it, as long as you are consuming, you’re not contributing. So, it is it is a waste of money it is a waste of money and time, a lot of times because if it if it hinders you from contributing, well you will stay a consumer. So, it’s more about connecting make thoughtful connection and honest connections with people but also contribute really be How can I contribute because I made a lot of speakers saying, Well, I don’t have anything to contribute because my niche is so so special. So yeah, but thing is, you always have something to contribute. You can share your mistakes you can share to spare, share your mistakes, nobody has to do it like, like what I did, with my altitude sickness, never fly in from sea level to LA pass Bolivia. That is a very bad idea. Yeah, that I’m sharing to spam. But also it’s like, what if, like, our business is so diverse? It’s like, What? What are you really, really good at, but maybe someone is really good at Facebook ads and can share that one, although they have a topic that is very, very niche, or someone is very good at proposals, or someone is very good at just stage presence, like, we have those little hacks that we can really give away. But it’s all about wanting to give away to really believe in collaboration and not believe in the competition.

James Taylor
And I think that I mean, if anyone’s watching this just now I think that’s the masterminds that could be really powerful or in speakers associations are the same as well, when you can, and I know in a lot of Speakers Association, they’ll have kind of subgroups within the speaker’s associations are focused on particular areas. And I think they could be incredibly powerful because We all have these different skills. I think sometimes that the hardest thing is to is to recognize the skills that you have, you mentioned that they like to recognize those skills that you have that you can contribute to the group and to other people. Because it, it feels so natural to you to do this, it feels natural to these Facebook ads, like okay, that’s fine. Here’s the natural to create, like a great trainers guide leaders guide for a workshop with me that would be like, Okay, how does that how does that work? You know? So So I think it’s, as you can start to get into this world of collaboration. It’s like having a mirror there people reflecting back to you saying, actually, I don’t think you can decide I think it’s like Frederick is brilliant at this, being that mirror and reflecting back to people saying, okay, you think this is the thing that you can actually but it’s, it’s actually this thing, that’s where your that’s where your genius that’s where your your great contribution can go as well. And I’m guessing that’s one of the benefits of being a member of our speakers Association because you have that ability to have that connection with The people that can reflect. And it’s, it’s difficult sometimes when you’re in the world outside of that, if you’re just in speaking to friends and family members, and they’re going, what is it? You do? Like, how did what do you do again?

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah, they don’t share the challenges and experiences. No. But it’s like, would you say that it’s like, doing those Facebook ads, it’s like it can feel so natural to you. And it’s like, and that’s exactly what Frederick is about with his inner theme. And that is exactly why you speaker is so good on stage because like, because it’s so natural to you. But that is what makes you unique. So it’s like, what is unique to us? We don’t see it. And that’s what people don’t think that oh, I don’t have anything to contribute. It’s like, but seriously, you’re you’re the best on this topic. It’s like you can really give give me your nugget, can I pick your brain can you just share, share, to spare share to care.

James Taylor
So in your journey as a speaker as you made this, this move And then what you were doing in a consultancy, and then you know, becoming a speaker that you are doing traveling the world as a speaker? Was there a key insight moment, an aha moment a time when you went, Oh, okay. This is the direction I want to go with my speaking or this is who I want to serve with my speaking. Can you maybe talk to an aha moment like that?

Mia Liljeberg
When the first aha moment was the, the, when we founded this Swedish speaker Association? Because I really remember when I, when I went to, to that meeting at at TI or south, and I was like, talking to my friend Leanna. Another speaker in the car is like, what is going to happen? We’re going to be 30 speakers over a week. And it’s like, what is the what? And then afterwards was just pure love? It’s like, wow, yeah, yeah, we so it was it was this mind shift. And as you say, that is probably what a lot of speakers outside associations cannot see. But once you’re in an association, you can see that is the mind shift. But still still within associations. There’s a lot of consumers And that is fine, because I mean, they pay their membership fees, and they get a ton of value. But if you really want to climb the mountain, can the mountain value, then you have to start to connect. And as you say, with the most amount, most of mine is a beautiful, deep connection,

James Taylor
I think, you know, one of the hacks I have, I’ve learned this in other other industries, other professions, and one of the things I was really keen to do early on in my speaking just as someone that were just kind of getting started was to find those those mentors, and yeah, because it’s one of the quickest ways to transfer knowledge and to learn and also to provide value. And yeah, and I’m, I don’t know, you’re probably the same, really fortunate to have mentors that can support you. And it’s, it’s not like a it’s like a where you’re just consuming stuff with it with a mental relationship you’re creating, how can I How can I be contributing to this this relationship as well, it’s a bit is is a two and it’s a real I, someone said to me the other day, he said, You should always have two mentors, you should have a mentor that’s older than you to who has wisdom and a mentor this younger than you to basically be kicking up the backside to say, okay, you know, I’ve got this older generation that’s coming up, they’re coming up fast. Yes, they stay on top, stay on, stay on it.

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah, that’s beautiful. Because, like you’re saying, with mentors, in order to have a mentor. You have to really be able to ask for a mentor. You really have to be able to ask for advice. And that is I think, what can go against people when they are so in their mask and role of speaker because I am a speaker I am the confident the expert is like, but you’re also a person who is on your journey to grow the business. So it’s like to really be honest and vulnerable to to be available for feedback. Yeah, I mean, we have a in Sweden we have something that we call colleague listening wishes. Anyone can anyone ask? A member can invite the other members to watch them while they speak. And also ask for feedback. And say, I would like to have feedback. And you can be very specific, specific on it, like, I have just tried this new thing. So could you just give a feedback on that. And like, it’s, it’s beautiful. Because it’s like, if you get really honest feedback from the person is like, and as with feedback, you can, you can take it as you want. And as there is no format for the feedback, it’s very honest. And some people can go into length about really, really detailed feedback. I saw this and it’s like, when you connect with this one, and you could really, you can really open the loop here and you could really prolong that one. And here, you really get the audience attention, but you will too fast is like that type of feedback you normally get when you hire a speaker coach, but you can never get it from the client. Because the client will always look at the content and the experience more more than the process and Then, and they craft something that is a really good way to grow as a speaker.

James Taylor
Yeah, I sometimes when when when I’m writing keynotes and working on keynotes, I, I’m almost writing them on three different levels, I’m breaking them. First of all, for the general the widest audience knows to one levels, I need to understand anyone that’s maybe they’re just starting an organization and have no knowledge of this topic that they’re going to get. And I’m going to connect with them. And then I write to someone who is who really gets understands this maybe a senior leader in an organization. So it needs to work at that level. And then I also write it for my mic. Almost my colleagues and the speaker Well, yeah, because I know that if I if I’m going to put this on, I send my stuff by some videos which way you should film your things. I’ve, I send my videos to my speaker friends, and they’ll come back with like real detailed notes and things. So I know if I’m going to do this, it’s going to be it’s going to be it has to work on all those three levels. Because if I just if I just couldn’t go purely for the craft Then I feel like cuz sometimes like the, the emotional part to it and like the board, but then but at the same time, if I just go right to the broadest level and just purely speak to that, then

Mia Liljeberg
then you’re not challenging yourself. You

James Taylor
don’t challenge yourself and also you’re not challenging the audience as well. Yeah. And it’s like speaking down. I don’t want to be speaking down to the audience. I’m treating trying to treat everyone in the audience. Like they’re smart people that you know that they’re in that room, they’re in that room to learn and that’s kind of part of my part, my job. What about you’re on the road just now you’re traveling from one country to the other? What is in your speaker bag, what is in that bag that you carry with you to all of your speaking engagements, cables, a lot of cables.

Mia Liljeberg
A lot of cables. What else? As I as I’m a facilitator, as well. I always bring a lot of things like a whiteboard markers and large prostitutes and tissue belts. I have the Hey Mike. Hey, Mick. Yeah, microphones? Yeah. Yes. Yeah. And selfie sticks. Yeah, that is in the small bag. But as I say, as I’m a workshop facilitate I have quite a huge workshop back.

James Taylor
You have to Morel. And then what about you mentioned like the haymakers that’s one type of app. Is there any other apps or online tools or mobile apps, for example, that you find really useful for yourself as a speaker?

Mia Liljeberg
Well, yeah, that’s that would be the CRM system to always have a CRM system, and I use Evernote a lot.

James Taylor
And what do you use for you? What do you use for your CRM system?

Mia Liljeberg
Currently, I’m using agile, agile CRM.

James Taylor
And then what about a book if you were to recommend one book to our audience? What would that book be?

Mia Liljeberg
This might sound a bit funny because it’s a very old book, but it was one of the last one I read. It says Friedman’s book about humor in speaking. And now I can’t remember the name of it.

James Taylor
I’ll find the link for and we’ve had Scott here is yes, I’m gonna find a link for that as well. And we’re gonna, because I

Mia Liljeberg
met, I met Scott. We talked about it at the global speakers on it, and then I read it directly after it was like, and it was it was good. And then I offered I saw how old it was. But it is good. You see what

James Taylor
I think that’s what every author wants to be able to read classic this read, you know, years and years in advance as well. Yeah. And I want to kind of give you a final and ultimate question here. Let’s imagine you woke up tomorrow morning, I’m gonna let you choose any city in the world to wake up in. You have all the skills that you’ve acquired over the years, but you know, no one no one knows you. So you have to restart your speaking career. What would you do? How would you restart?

Mia Liljeberg
It would be too easy if there was a city with an association in it because then I would just to go to the association to stop make connection but otherwise it would probably be just to stop Connecting networking. Yeah, I would just start networking as I as I’ve been living in so many countries. I mean, I’ve been doing this several times, going to a new country, new cities like, okay, I don’t know anyone here. I’m here to do my job. Okay. Yeah. And you get it. So it’s, yeah. And it’s so different from city to city country to countries like, yeah, in some countries, people are very open and you can talk to each other just when you’re crossing the street. And in some countries, people don’t talk to each other. So then you have to be

James Taylor
a bit more active. Any any kind of final things. Maybe there’s was it was a one of your favorite ways to collaborate that you discussed in that in that guy that we’re going to have a link to,

Mia Liljeberg
I would say, it’s all about the mind shift to really go from competing to collaborating to really, really open up because it is about opening up and Trusting other people. And so I mean, once you start do that and start to give to give, because it will be quite obvious if you’re just giving to get that is not really getting in exponential growth. But as soon as you start to give to give, there will be even if I said that collaborate with a purpose, this funny thing that happened is that, even if you’re collaborating with purpose, things will come to you that you could never imagine. And you would never be able to see them before. But it’s like, that’s the snowball effect. It’s, you’re in for a surprise.

James Taylor
And if people want to connect with you, maybe they maybe they have an idea for a project to collaborate on. Or maybe there’s, they want to invite you to meet with someone that’s watching or listening to this in Canada just now. They want to bring you over to how we bring into Canada. where’s the best place for them to go to to connect with you, and there will be in my whole year on LinkedIn. There’s only three of us. So I’m the Swedish mealybug or at my homepage, me at my homepage. nillable calm Or just to connect with email at me@mealybug.com help me I feel pleasure speaking to you today I hope you get well soon because I know you’ve had these big variations in terms of where you’ve been traveling to as well. And I look forward to getting a chance to meet in person as well.

Mia Liljeberg
Yeah, great. Same to you. Thank you.

James Taylor
Today’s episode was sponsored by speakers you the online community for speakers and if you’re serious about your speaking career then you can join us because you membership program. I’ll speak as you members receive private one on one coaching with me hundreds of hours of training content access to a global community to help them launch and build a profitable business around their speaking message and expertise. So just head over to SpeakersU.com to learn more.

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