SL061: How To Adapt To A Changing Speaking Industry – with Jeffrey Hayzlett

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Adapting to Changes

jeffrey hayzlett

In today’s episode Jeffrey Hayzlett talks about How To Adapt To A Changing Speaking Industry.

Jeffrey Hayzlett is a CPAE Speaker Hall of Fame inductee and now primetime television host of C-Suite with Jeffrey Hayzlett and Executive Perspectives on C-Suite TV. He is the author of four best-selling business books including his most recent with Entrepreneur Press: The Hero Factor: How Great Leaders Transform Organizations and Create Winning Cultures. A frequent television business commentator, you might see him telling it like it is on networks such as Bloomberg, CNN, MSNBC, and Fox Business. You might even recognize him from his numerous appearances as a judge on NBC’s Celebrity Apprentice show.

  • National Speakers Association
  • C-Suite
  • Og Mandino
  • Napoleon Hill
  • Skip Ross
  • Norman Vincent Peale
  • Frank Sinatra
  • Stop whining
  • Being a business first responder
  • Adaptability
  • Primates
  • Relentless
  • Performing onscreen
  • Grabbing the mic
  • Anticipating questions
  • Pausing
  • How to use humor on virtual presentations
  • The end of the speaker bureau?
  • 1,2 or 3 trick ponies
  • Subscriptions
  • Fame or fortune
  • Thought value chain
  • The onstage speaker model

Books: How To Win Friends And Influence People by Dale Carnegie

http://hayzlett.com/

Artificial Intelligence Generated Transcript

Below is a machine-generated transcript and therefore the transcript may contain errors.

James Taylor
Hey, there’s James Taylor and I’m delighted today to have on the show Jeffrey Hayzlett. Jeffrey Jeffrey Hayzlett is a CPA speaker Hall of Fame Inductee, and now primetime television host of C-Suite with Jeffrey Hayzlett and executive perspectives on C-Suite TV. He is the author of four best selling business books, including his most recent with entrepreneur press, the hero factor, how great leaders transform organizations and create winning cultures. Our frequent television business commentator, you might see him telling it like is on networks, including MSNBC, Fox Business, Bloomberg and CNN. You might even recognize him from his numerous appearances as a judge on NBC as Celebrity Apprentice shares my great pleasure to have Jeffrey with us today. So welcome,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
guys, thanks so much for having me. I appreciate it. This is awesome.

James Taylor
So share with us what’s happening in your world at the moment.

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Right now um, you know, we I leave the C suite network which is the world’s largest trusted network for executives and we’re building out our C suite radio which are Podcast Network, we’re building out C suite, TV C suite Academy, you name it anything with C suite, we just launched C suite loans. We’re about to launch C suite supplies, we got c Suite Marketplace coming down the pike. I’m in the middle of three acquisitions. So you know, it’s been a pretty busy time for me.

James Taylor
So take us back a little bit, because you have that you’ve had this entire other career, which a lot of people in the speaking industry don’t necessarily know about, which was your role in a CMO of a very well known business. So take us through the transition, because I know there’s a lot of people that listen, watch this, who are maybe in the corporate world and I’ve always gotten interested in maybe in making that that transition into what a professional speaking

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, I was actually a speaker before I went into the corporate world, you know, I was an entrepreneur and then became a speaker. I joined the National Speakers Association back when I was 26 years old, you know, sitting around the table with Zig Ziglar. And oh, gosh, Brian Tracy, and, you know, some of the greatest speakers in the world I got a chance to sit side by side niba need an E with over the years and then went into the corporate world I bought and sold over 250 businesses about 25 billion in transaction became the chief marketing officer of a fortune 100 company served in a number of capacities in in the C suite mostly always as a chief sales or Chief Marketing Officer, but also CEO of my own companies and now of course chairman of a number of companies serve on about 14 boards today. Three of them are have been publicly traded companies so a little bit of everything you know, you’ve moved so I mean treats. This always blows my mind for a lot of speakers are just kind of coming into it. They haven’t heard name necessarily like Zig Ziglar Brian Tracy, some of the some of the names that you mentioned, get out, get out more often they should be the greatest speakers of all time, right.

James Taylor
I remember I remember interviewing a while back guy, Jim Kiska, we were just talking about some of these needs. But years ago kind of being introduced some of these but one I’d never really checked out before this was going back to Betamax or VHS. I guess I could never get them was augmon Dino and through the power of YouTube now I went on a complete augmon Dino binge Of what?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, you should as well you should I mean, the author the book, the salesman, probably one of the greatest all time motivational books of all time. love to read it Have I have a signed copy of it? leather bound edition right here in my, in my office, you know, the same thing like with Dale Carnegie, Napoleon Hill, Think and Grow Rich, Aye. Aye. I’m reading chapter 10 of that book right now, because of our mastermind work that we do in the C suite network. We have hundreds and hundreds and hundreds of members in various groups that are what we call councils or masterminds in the C suite network. And of course, Napoleon Hill was the the, you know, the originator of the mastermind, of course, now I think it’s been bastardized by a bunch of people. People don’t know what they’re doing. But nonetheless, you know, it’s a great way and the right way to do it. But yeah, there are some of those names skip Ross. You know, augmentee know, Bill Brooks, who’s now past former coach at Syracuse, and, you know, used to lead the fighting padres. I laugh about that, because he was a football coach of the fighting padres things. I mean, imagine what do you I mean, would you really get pumped up? What do you do? Just take a knee and pray, I guess is what you do. But, you know, he was, but I used to sit with those folks. You know, when I was 26 years old, as a member of that Association, and there used to be like, 200 people as part of NSA back then it wasn’t a lot of people. You know, it would go to a convention and you’d be in the room with those people. Right? And I say those people meaning some of the greatest speakers of all time now in the Hall of Fame, but you know, yeah, go just go look at some of the greats you should be googling those people you should be understanding and learning and going to the archives to listen to to Norman Vincent Peale. You No power positive thinking, you know, I, when I’m in New York and my home in New York, I live across the street from his church, you know, marble church, and of course, Michael Brown has been the pastor there since Dr. Peale passed. And then Michael Brown took over and has been the pastor there for 30 some years and, you know, one of the greatest oranges of our time, but you’ll never hear about that name, of course, but he learned in the shadow of Norman Vincent Peale. You know, my daughter sings at that church, you know, in New York, so it’s just, yeah, it’s amazing when you but you know, but there’s older folks who haven’t heard some of the young names, right. Yeah. So I guess it goes both ways. But if you’re good at what you do, okay, and especially the speaker, you should be looking at what other speakers do good and bad. So you can say, Yep, I like to learn that I can learn from that, you know, you know, to take apart some of the great masters of today like Mark Sean Brock, who’s a Polish famer, you know to watch him do his craft. Now what he does isn’t what I do, but to see him pick apart and how he meticulously does his craft. I love that to watch a good preacher. And then watch what they do to watch a good politician. Watch what they do to watch a good actor or a good comedian. I love to watch you know different things or even listen to old records, you know, or if your tapes or shows like Jerry clower mouth of the South, which you will never even you’ve never heard of James I’m sure no.

James Taylor
You would just mentioned this to my wife the other night, my wife’s a jazz singer. And, and I remember coming coming to Florida speaking obviously, was watching all these great videos from some of these incredible speakers. But then also watching people like Frank Sinatra and seeing about how they use their body, their posture, how they could command the stage and tell a story. And and there’s a lot of people like that I remember kind of looking at it. I’d love to be able to take that, that string down Power on stage and there’s a playfulness on stage and translate that into the world of speaking as well. So we can learn,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
How do you take? How do you take something that’s, you know, 8000 people you might be performing to or speaking to, and then pause in such a way that 8000 people become so silent, that you can hear a cough in the back of the room, you know, to and then what’s the technique that you would learn from you know how to do that what to do or when to stand so close to the stage that you’re almost falling off that everyone’s in unison, right. Or that I can tell you there’s a moment of when I used to take a video camera and show it on stage and and throw it in a pitcher of water with it live and people would scream because I thought I just ruined the video camera when it’s a waterproof video camera, and then proceed to then take it out and pour a glass you know the entire pitcher of water. water on it on stage making this mess, you know, and think, you know, just doing different things like that. The techniques that you learn so some of those things I quite frankly, just do, you know, and just try, right. I don’t think of them ahead of time

James Taylor
when we’re now obviously in a time the whole idea of doing virtual presentations, obviously really accelerated. Lots of organizations have talked about it for years. Lots of universities have talked about going online for years. And finally, overnight, they’ve had to do they’ve had to make that transition very quickly. What are some as your I know, you obviously with things like C suite network, and your your online, kind of presentations that you do as well, you can relatively early into this. Yeah, for those maybe those speakers are watching this just now. And I’m going to say not just younger speakers or new into but maybe the speakers who are very, very comfortable going up there and speaking on stage in front of 500 people or 5000 people, but now I have this screen screen to what we’re communicating in with this slightly to medium, what advice would you give them on how to create that same energy? Same kind of power that same transformation audience online?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well quit quit Quit whining. So Quit whining that you you can’t do it like you used to do it and start to say, what how can I do it? How can I make that square? so interesting that they only want to look at me? What background Can I put in? What graphics Can I add? What animation must I do? That will get garner the attention of one of you know, 120 screens or so filled with 1215 people on each screen or whatever the number is? how can how can you be that person that’s so intriguing that they don’t want to leave their desktop, right? And so it’s really about it’s doing the same thing you were doing before, but just in a different tiny size point a thumbnail, right? And that’s the difference that I think it’s a mindset of saying, look, look, I can’t help right now with what’s going on with COVID I can’t I’m not a doctor. I’m not a nurse, I can’t even sew a frickin mask right? But what I am is a business first responder. So what I am is someone who can help I can motivate I can inspire I can educate, I can show empathy I can do I can give you a kick in the ass I can I can bring you through when you can’t do it. I will calm you down when you need to be calm down. That’s my job. My job. All right, my, my mission is to do that. So rather than sit there and say, Well, my I used to do it this way. Do it this way. Change, adapt or die. Go. That’s it, folks. That’s your choice. So rather than sitting around as a speaker, bemoaning the fact that you’re not your your, your gigs are canceling got it. Okay, while your gigs are canceling. I’m doing five a day. And I have never been busier. You hear my voice right now cracking because I literally am so tired from speaking all day every day. And I’m making money with it without question. Okay. More than I have made in lots of years, okay? Because I’m adapting to a new norm. And, and so I’m not sitting back complaining, I’m not gonna make my one K, forget the one K, I’m looking to buy my own jet now. All right. I’m not saying I will. But my point is or bigger, a bigger computer screen and better mics at board graphics for animation, right? Because I’m doing what I’m doing and I don’t have to wear pants. You know, if that’s the case, right? You know, but unless you want to stand up and you want to get that experience, which you certainly can do, you figure out the things that make it more interesting. Even as you and I are talking, we’re talking over a visual medium, right in the background. There’s my logo for TV. There’s my green screen with the beautiful background got proper lighting, looks like I’m sitting in a studio, right? So there’s ways in which you can start to do it in different make it making exciting, that’s our job.

James Taylor
And one of the words you mentioned was this what adoptability there was a there was a natural kind of history program on TV. Last night here in the UK on the BBC, when there’s going to Attenborough type programs, and it was all about primates, like baboons, monkeys, chimpanzees, and the narrator said something interesting. He said adaptability and resilience are the hallmarks of primates is of us of what we you know, kind of what we’re about. So you can have that that first part is the adaptability piece you were talking about when it comes to because you’ve obviously you’ve had this life on the stage as a presenter of ideas and inspiring people. But you’ve also spent a lot of time doing that kind of small screen as well. Now, in the same way, we say I was watching a Michael Caine masterclass, and he’s talking about difference between acting on stage as opposed to acting on screen. There’s different ways you use your eyes, your physicality. What did you learn from all those years of whether it’s a CNN in front of camera or being up there doing one of your C suite network? of recordings as well, that you think something you may want to pass on to other speakers but how they communicate in this medium?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, their performances. First of all, thanks for thinking me with primates. That was great. It was a great
absolutely we’re all come from the same same genre jeans have. But the and by the way, relentless is one of my keywords just being relentless. You know, I don’t always do it, right. But I will be relentless in getting there. You know, and I will make a lot of mistakes, you know, people talk about fail, fail, you know, fail fast, bullshit, win fast. That’s what I want to do. I don’t want to fail fast. I want to win fan, I’m going to fail. Trust me, I will fail. But I’d much rather win fast. But yeah. So when you talk about performance, talk about those screens in the different genres and what how would you? How do you act? How do you present? Well, it’s a performance. So whether it’s performance on stage or performance in on screen or a one to one performance, don’t you want to be prepared, don’t you want to be ready and I I’ve actually found that on television, you have to anticipate, how do you grab? How do you grab the mic? You know? Who was it? Diana Ross once told Michael Jackson when they give you the mic, never let go, right. And I’ve learned, you know, those are some of the things you want to be able to do understand the cadence of that discussion on TV, that it’s a give and take, and you have to give them a chance, you know, just like in a podcast, and you have to give them a chance to ask you the right kind of question because you’re here as a guest, but I’m here to perform. I’m here to help you get that message across and be the best so people can say, Oh my gosh, did you hear Oh, James had on the show, right? And so what you want to do is anticipate those questions and understand and have responses ready. And especially if you’re doing it for small screen, they have to be memorable kinds of responses because what you want to do is have those clips those quotes, those those things that they’ll pull out those little tiny nuggets, were in the small screen, especially for you know, like an interview or for television interviews or for that type of presentation, you only have those short burst, you can’t tell the story, you don’t have the luxury of the story as if you are on stage and you can act it out and you can be sometimes more animated. So you have to be animated with the oral, okay. And the face, okay, as opposed to the body leaning in leaning out pausing. If you pause in television, they will jump in with another question, right? So you have to you have to learn how to do those kinds of things and understand that that cadence, that energy that you have in each of those genres is different.

James Taylor
And how do you use humor? Because I always find this is, this is hard. I was I was speaking, doing an event last week and it was for a client, the client was in India was a telecoms company. And so there’s obviously the cultural thing you can thinking about because primarily the audience was in India, but then I’m also thinking about how I want to use humor on some of it because I know What might work on stage when I can roll up jokes in line? I don’t have the ability sometimes to do. So how do you kind of find using humor on these different media,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
I find that with humor, it has to be directed at you when it’s on that small screen. It has to be about you can’t be about them because they don’t have a way to fight back or give it back. In an audience setting of a group. I can not only be self deprecating, but I can make fun of the audience. I can say when they don’t laugh, I can say Oh, come on. That was frickin funny, you know? Do you you know, like or when no one laughs Come on. People don’t have cable TV. I mean, come on, you get out more often. You can have fun with the group because you can build it up. You can’t do that one to one. It’s much more personal because they don’t see the other people they just see you and them. And so there is that connection as opposed to that group kind of occurred in the crowd. Where they can they can kind of, you know, feel safer. You can’t feel a safe When you’re one to one, you get more and more, it’s more much more emotional This way, you would think it’s less emotion because it’s so detached. Oh, but there’s more, you know, watch chat rooms. I’ve watched people who’ve gone on, you know, on these do events. And there’s people carrying on an entire chat about other things not related to the speaker at all. Like, can you believe they don’t have more women speaking? Bah, bah, bah, bah, bah. I was. That was one of the other you know, things I was watching about somebody the other day they were, I was waiting in the wings. Right. And, and then I’m watching the chat going on. And, and yet the speaker didn’t address it at all. It just kept going. And I thought, ooh, so I addressed that when I got there. And now, you know, I might so they were talking about not having enough women. I said, I can’t believe you out your heart. You got this big white guy, you know, to come and speak to you, I guess, you know, and so I just had some fun with that right? Boom. To pull them in right away.

James Taylor
You’ve got the interactivity happening, which you can it’s almost like you know, looking at the eye of the audience, you can pick up certain things that’s your your eyes, you’re kind of looking at that,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, you have to so so I always have a staff person or to who’s in the audience and watching that stuff and then over to the right or left, they’re feeding me that information. In real time, Jeff, watch out, this is being said this, this, this, and I can address it right there. And that shows that I’m paying attention. Now normally, if I were on TV, I’ve got IBF right here in my ear, and I got a producer talking to me, and you know, give me countdowns times. key questions, key points that I can bring up about you. The fact that you broke your leg when you were 13 Baba, whatever it might be that you know that she knows or he knows, I don’t have so in this in a stage you don’t do that in the stage, right. You’re, you’re presenting, it’s you it’s that it’s the it’s live, it’s gritty, but in the TV and or online, I can get those kinds of pieces and it’s interactive and I think that’s a better way of doing it these days. I mean, I like that I hey, you just ask a question. I think this is a great time to take a pause. And let me get to that question because I’ve it’s very important. And I think it’s very relevant to the point that I just talked about, you know, that shows I’m paying attention to them,

James Taylor
you know, so you’ve been told by obviously, some speakers are still like deers in the headlights just now. You can like figure out what about when it comes to the bureau side, when you’re having conversation with your bureau partners? Where are they at? Are they still

Jeffrey Hayzlett
They’ve been stopped, they’ve been down, they’ve been stopped and they have they’re still they’re still working on the old model. And I think some of them are starting to get the new model. I just got another booking, you know, for half my fee, but I don’t care. It’s half my fee and I got the time I’m taking it right. That you know, because it’s inventory, your time is inventory folks as a speaker so if you’re not using the inventory, okay, then your inventory gets discounted. That’s what happens. Okay. So way business works. And so, but I’m filling it up and I’m taking it. But if it’s an interactive presentation online, I can’t remember how many people but yeah, we’re we’re doing a lot more of those. But so some viewers are getting the new model. And this is going to be a new model. But let’s be clear, it’s going to be a new model. Doing this isn’t going to go away.

James Taylor
And then when it comes, I mean thing always fascinated me about but what you do is you, you have that kind of public persona with the, you know, the keynote speaker that the speaker world knows you about. There’s a persona that you have, which is very much for the consumer when you’re on CNN and things like that. And then you have this whole C suite network. And I find that really fascinating because so many speakers would maybe just go down the route of let’s say, maybe online courses or maybe some training thing they they have some certification, for example, but you went in a slightly different way. So because I think

Jeffrey Hayzlett
this is actually an evolution so so where you’re what you were talking about with the traditional model is most speakers are what we call one two or three trick pony. So you have your speak, then you might have a product. And then you might have a service or subscription. I’ve just taken the subscription on steroids and I just haven’t had 350,000. And then on top of it, I have 170 podcast shows which other authors and speakers and thought leaders are part of. I have other television shows that other speakers authors, so I’m monetizing that and then monetizing the community and monetizing the content. So all I did was take what my my audience my tribe was, increase it and say who else is relevant in this tribe that would like to come and play? So the C suite network is very much like a giant sequoia tree, you know, big Redwood. And if you’ve ever been in a redwood forest or a big forest with these massive old trees, well, there’s a canopy and underneath the canopy is this very lush ecosystem? That’s the C suite network. Well, who else has done that? Facebook LinkedIn, Salesforce, Amazon. And so what we’re doing is building a platform. And so I started early on, I said, Look, I can have fame or I can have fortune, I’d rather have fortune. And if I’m really good at what I do, I’ll get the fame for free. And if not, I can afford to pay for it, if that’s what I want, right? So what we’re doing is building a platform for people to operate underneath that canopy of the C suite in that environment of a trusted ecosystem. And then how can we all help each other, but because if we learn, you know, together, if we share we learn, then we cheer. And then of course, we care. And so for me, it’s always about you know, the, the really the relevancy of us together, what’s relevant. So that’s the C suite, the business community, then it’s about our reach, combining my reach which is big, huge, I admit that and then the, then your reach, you know, might be a little bit less but together with you and all of these thousands or hundreds of other thoughts. leaders, it’s massive. And then it becomes about reciprocity, and how do I help you and you help me. And if we can get that that’s a win win. And that’s what that’s what I’m about.

James Taylor
You’re always reminding me now of your lady Oprah of the of the C suite, because it’s not about just your brand, or your what you’re one of brands. But I always thought what Oprah was amazing at doing with Harper and her business was kind of building other brands, whereas Dr. Phil, or you know, the other brands around her as well. And when you start working with maybe some of those other brands, thought leaders, experts, and when you help them understand that C suite, that subscriber to your C suite network, what are some of the key things you try to impart upon them to really help them understand that mindset or that the how

Jeffrey Hayzlett
how to leverage that IP and then how to build their own community. So I’m teaching them we have a slide that I call the thought value chain and it teaches them all along The 2030 points of products and services and things that you could, you know, give time for and giving time for you can get get more revenue for. And most of us are way down in the lower left hand portion of that of that value chain. And we only speak or we only have a book or we only have a podcast, or we only have a course or training. Well, what about the alumni group? What about the courses? What about the academy? What about your council? Your mastermind? What about a supergroup? What about me? I can keep going of what about enablement, tools? All the things that you can do that you’re missing out on as a result of just saying I’m a speaker, right, rather than a real thought leader? And then what does that thought leadership mean? And then with that, how do you then operate inside or under that in that ecosystem or under that canopy? And by doing so we can add zeros, we add zeros to what they do. And we have hundreds of these folks that are part of this network that are doing that every day. Now You know, I, I promote myself and my brand well, because that’s what I got. Right. But I’d much rather promote hundreds of others because I can get a lot bigger, you know,

James Taylor
that almost reminds me of the way an investor like Ray Dalio would go and build a would build investment. He has the all weather fund, where it has 40% are in low risk bonds, which is like subscriptions, essentially all memberships, but 30% are in stocks, high risk stocks, which is kind of at the keynote side, you know, it’s when the economy is really good, it’s really good when it’s not good. And then he has like the, you know, the consulting and then and so, it is almost like regardless of where the economy goes, he’s winning in that as well on the

Jeffrey Hayzlett
the on stage James the onstage model only is a dying model, you know, you know, post post Corona, those people who will make it will be a very low in the very high end What I mean by that, so those willing to basically do it for free. And then those who get paid a lot of money for like myself another who are very professional, but they have to be a, they have to be a professional athlete, a celebrity, they’re going to have to be a subject matter expert, or they’re going to have to be an unbelievable entertainer. Right. And some of us are a little bit of all that, right. And, and so those folks are going to continue to thrive in what we’re doing. Those that just follow them the marketplace of I’m a keynote speaker, I’m just a speaker, right? It’s going to be very tough as events go away, right? As they do things in different ways, but those at the low end will make it because they do it for free. Right. So they’ll continue to do the TED talks and the you know, the free stuff and the little stuff that really doesn’t matter. And you know, or you know what I’m talking about in terms of your pocket book. They’ll still do it, they’ll still do it. But if you unless you’re a subject matter matter experts and entertainer you know a notable a well known and really good at what you do it’s going to be a tough so you should be building a community you should be looking at the value chain and how you want to increase it and do it differently and you should be joining every damn group you can get your hands in you know get into and put your feet first and and just and don’t always look for what’s in it for me look at what can I do to enhance this group and get something out of it? That’s the way to think about it. You know if you’re going in with a servant mentality it’s awesome if you go into it with well what am I going to get? Well then when I hear people come to our C suite network and they asked me Well, what am I going to get? I say you know this isn’t for you. This isn’t for you. I think we’re talking about the wrong thing so they go No no no I want to be know if you’re if your primary reasons just to come in here and to rape and pillage so to speak, then and just sell sell sell. Nope, not interested. Don’t don’t, I don’t want that. If you want to come and say, Tell me what you can give how you can add more value to this community, then you’ll get the more you give, the more you get. And that’s the way that’s the new this new economy. That’s the way to look at it.

James Taylor
So what role then does the bureau have in this new economy? Because you think, well, if what you’re kind of talking about in terms of those, essentially the superstar thought leaders, which that lends itself very well to I already company entertainment industry, so like a Live Nation model, 360 degree model wraps around the speaker, they do the merchandise, the live the publishing everything. They’re like the CEO, the concealing Aires of those thought leaders, businesses, so I want to I can see that in the speaker management companies. But then what role does the bureaus have now?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, that’s so they’ll start changing the model has to change for them. The bureau I love bureaus, I mean, we do about 35% of our business to bureaus and I And I love bureaus we have great relationship with bureaus, but bureaus don’t work for me. bureaus work for the client. So bureaus are representing their amalgamating. They’re there, they’re consolidating, they’re looking at all the things that are available and then present that up to their client, their client being the person that’s hiring the speaker, not the speaker. There is no bureau that works for the speaker. Now, I know we work in a partnership. And I don’t want to say but if you really look at what bureaus, do, they they’re working for the client, and they’re helping to be a demand aggregator of what they need and how they need it, and then deliver that experience and pick the best person and saying, well, we need all this stuff out and do that, but they’re working for the client. So yeah, if they’re going to look at different models, and by the way, I don’t know that even the speaker management model is going to work unless you get some big speakers with some big fees, right? Yeah. Because it’s just gonna be you know, it’s just going to be a little bit different. So, you know, a lot of people say, Well, I want somebody to manage me, well, you got nothing to manage. You’re paying somebody

James Taylor
00 Yeah, exactly. So yeah,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
you know, there’s lots of things to look at it, but I, you know, there, there will always be, I mean, for really great businesses, and there are some bureaus that are really great at what they do. Well, that’s what you’re gonna see they’re gonna survive, they’re gonna be they’re the ones that that aren’t as good. You know, that don’t have that value that don’t have the, the servant mentality that don’t have the client base and the relationships because it’s always about relationships. That’s what’s going to carry them through. And so they’re going to have some difficult.

James Taylor
So as we start to finish up here, just a couple of final kind of quick questions for you. We were talking about the augmon dinos and Brian Tracy’s earlier on as well. If you were to recommend one book to our audience, maybe it could be a book about how to adapt now to this new age, this new time that we’re in or it could be an absolute classic. We just had these essential principles and Neil, you know, time doesn’t really change them. What would the book be that you’d recommend?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
The easiest book I can suggest How to Win Friends and Influence People by Dale Carnegie, I read it every single year, it’s still tested, it still passes the test of time, you know, just no different than the Bible, no different than certain types of books there. I’m not saying they’re comparatively the same. But my point is, there are certain books that are grounded in what we do. You know, I would also, you know, give a self plug but to push my hero factor book about how to set your how to how to build a company that puts people but prophets, and how do you build hero cultures? And I think we’re at we’re at some turning points. Right now in our, in our society, I think this isn’t going to make us friendlier. It’s just going to make us more human. And, and I this entire experience is going to really lay us out a little bit for a while. And I think it’s been a good pause a good you know, permission to pause for us to say, what’s what’s important, and that’s so now we’re taking the time to look at sunsets now. We’re taking the time to fly you know, To bake a little bit more, cook a little bit more, to be with family a little bit more to have, like, you know, have kids across from you at the desk going to school that you’re helping with school, when you should have been doing that anyway. Right? That, you know, I got my brother in law living with me, you think that I want that I want that. Well, now it’s turning out to be a really nice thing. So those are the things that you want to look at, I think and say, yeah, these are the right things to do.

James Taylor
And actually, essentially, you mentioned that book, How to Win Friends and Influence People I was looking at the other day, because I was looking at old books had been written during the Great Depression. And that was actually one of the books had been written during a depression and and you would think it was very dark time. But there was actually a lot of amazing businesses that were started a lot of amazing books are written a lot of amazing films that were created by Marx Brothers fan, what the great Marx Brothers movies were created during that time as well. So there’s gonna be a lot of very good things. They’re going to come out this time.

Jeffrey Hayzlett
Well, there’s going to be great businesses. Look at the last, the last the last recession. Bond, Arab Airbnb spawned Uber, go back even further and look during other downturns, some of the greatest business, you know, there’s a saying don’t waste a good crisis. Don’t waste a good crisis. So the question for each speaker that’s sitting here listening right now is, what are you doing to make sure that you don’t waste the time? And I think that’s a key question for you. What are you doing that you could then up your game and change it exponentially to be something bigger and better to take the message that you have and exponentially? You know, make it more relevant for today and make it greater in terms of its reach? That’s, that’s a good question for people. I’m doing my best. I’ve never worked harder. I have absolutely never worked harder during this entire time. This this last seven weeks that we’re into this already as part of this thing. Not to not make this evergreen but I don’t care whenever it is, what do you don’t let a day go by without saying I’m going to make a difference or doing a different way? I wouldn’t Do that.

James Taylor
Now one question, kind of final question I asked all my guests is, imagine if you woke up tomorrow morning, and you had to start from scratch. It’s an interesting question. This time we’re living in just now as well. So, Jeffrey, I want you to imagine tomorrow morning, you wake up, you have to start from scratch, you’ve got all the knowledge, you’ve acquired all the expertise, but no one knows you. And you know, no one, what would you do? How would you resolve things?

Jeffrey Hayzlett
I, first of all, I would do it faster. And I would do it with greater intensity, I wouldn’t care so much about what other people think. That’s the first thing. So and and I think by the way, the closer you get to who you really are in your intensity of that authenticity, the better it is. So that’s what I would do it and by the way, I gain it and do it one fan at a time, one friend at a time. And then by and I did that’s what I would do. I wouldn’t change much more than that. And I would do it every single day just like that. You know, listen, if you grow 1010 people on your LinkedIn a day at the end of the year, you got to 3650 new people you never knew before. If you if you did you know, 10 of this, or 10 of this are just simple things that builds it up and it’s real. It’s not fake. It’s not bullshit. It’s real. And I built my entire career on just doing that. And I’m going to continue to do that because you know why? Because I can and that’s why I want to do it though.

James Taylor
Well, Jeffrey, thank you for continuing to do that and cutting coming on shows and sharing your knowledge in this way as well where especially for people to go to learn more about your speaking bolts or to learn things about C suite that would be Yeah,

Jeffrey Hayzlett
just go to Hayzlett.com. H A Y Z L E T T .com or go check me out on C-Suite, look up anything with C-Suite, C-Suite network or C-Suite, TV C-Suite, radio C-Suite, book club, C-Suite TV, that we own them all, and you can come find us.

James Taylor
Well, Jeff, thanks so much for coming out today. I wish you and your family all the best. Stay safe, stay healthy, and I’m sure that you are going to use this time you’re going to create some amazing things.

Jeffrey Hayzlett
We’re going to have some fun and thanks so much James. Oh, It’s a pleasure to be on your show. Thank you.

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